Vanity with Painted Burlap Drawers

So I was setting up for a show, and another vendor had this vanity, along with a full size headboard and I had to have it. I had to sand it down quite a bit, and take the veneer off the top because is was irreparable. If I was going to keep this for myself, I would have painted the tops gray, and just clear-coated the shabby, awesome finish on this. I love all the soft colors and the really shabby look.

Stripped Vanity

But, alas, I have no where to put this lovely little vanity, so I needed a finish that appeal to many, not just me. So I solicited some advice from my FB friends, who suggested leaving it as is, painting it light green, cream with burlap drawer fronts, and a vote for a whitewashing.

I went with the white wash, and painted burlap drawers. I’m tickled with the result; some of the colors come through the wash, and the painted burlap drawers are just too cute!
White washing the vanity let me brighten up the color, get rid of some stains, and still let some of the other colors come through. Here you can see some of the pinks, grays, and greens that show through the whitewash.

I kept a damp rag handy, and wiped the whitewash off of any exposed colors or wood that I wanted to show through. I really like the “chippy” finish that was on the piece, and didn’t want to cover it up.

I also noticed that even though I was using a satin finish, by cutting with water for the white wash, I got more of a matte finish from the whitewash.

Once I had the vanity painted, I used taupe paint to antique some of the details by brushing it on, then wiping it off with a damp rag. You can use a glaze to accomplish this, but paint and a rag is cheaper. 🙂

Getting the burlap on the drawers wasn’t hard, but it does take a bit of time.
First, cut it to the size of the drawers, cutting very close to the weave to it won’t unravel. Then drag the piece of burlap through Elmer’s glue. There needs to be enough glue on the burlap so it soaks the fabric when you apply it. Once it’s dry, iron down the edges so there are no fibers sticking up. (Don’t use your good iron for this, the glue melts onto it!)

Next, apply the stencil by applying spray adhesive to the back of the stencil and press firmly. Fill in the burlap weave with the paint, working from the edge of the stencil to the center. Be sure to center the stencil!

Once the paint is dry, I used  a knife to cut the hole for the hardware. The paint and glue will prevent the burlap from unraveling. Be sure you let the glue and paint dry first. If you try to cut when they are still damp, the burlap may pull, and then it looks bad. a little patience will ensure the painted burlap drawers come out perfectly.

And here’s is the finished vanity. This took about 4 hours from start to finish. I spent $100 on the vanity, about 2.00 on the burlap, and used maybe 3.00 worth of paint. I reused the original hardware, painted to match. So, what do you think?

3 Comment

  1. I like the burlap drawer fronts–what a good idea!

  2. Chalk Paint Recipe Roundup: Mix your own chalk paint! The Flying C says:

    […] After mixing up and trying the various recipes, I still like the chalk (calcium carbonate) from Kremer’s the best.  I think it delivers the smoothest paint with the most consistent finish. Plaster of Paris finishes up second, with a nod to the fact that its readily available at Lowe’s or Hobby Lobby, and doesn’t need to be slaked, so its a faster prep.  Nix on the baking soda or unsanded grout.  To see the results of my chalk paint recipe using Kremer’s chalk, check out this Grainsack inspired dresser, and this awesome vanity! […]

  3. Mix your own chalk paint! ~ The Flying C says:

    […] After mixing up and trying the various recipes, I still like the chalk (calcium carbonate) from Kremer’s the best.  I think it delivers the smoothest paint with the most consistent finish. Plaster of Paris finishes up second, with a nod to the fact that its readily available at Lowe’s or Hobby Lobby, and doesn’t need to be slaked, so its a faster prep.  Nix on the baking soda or unsanded grout.  To see the results of my chalk paint recipe using Kremer’s chalk, check out this Grainsack inspired dresser, and this awesome vanity! […]

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